Call Us630-665-2500

124C S. County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL 60187

children and divorce, divorce trends, low self-esteem, marital dissolution, severe fatigue, Wheaton family law attorney, childhood self-esteem, child depressionDivorce studies often identify the emotional effects marital dissolution can have on children. Divorce can impact school work, peer socialization, and future marriages once children become adults. However, one conclusion has emerged throughout several studies showing that a daughter's self-esteem is more susceptible when parents divorce than the self-esteem of a son.

A study of 5,631 teenagers revealed that almost one-fourth of girls with absent fathers in their early childhood years grew into teenagers who suffered from depression. Another 23 percent developed severe fatigue and sadness in their adult years when divorce occurred before they were five years old. These young girls were 50 percent more likely to struggle with psychological and emotional problems later on than older girls whose parents divorced. On the other hand, only one out of ten young boys suffered from depression in their teens years when their parents split up. For older boys, the number increased to 17 percent.

In addition, another study published in the Journal of Divorce & Remarriage revealed almost identical results in its survey of 102 adult children of divorce. The study "The Psychological Adjustment of Adult Children of Divorce," found that daughters suffered from low self-esteem when they had a parent absent from their life at an early age. Sons who went through the same experiences did not. This study also found a daughter's self-esteem was more affected by the arguing and conflicts between the parents both during the marriage and after the divorce, but again, a son's self-esteem was not.

...

Continue Reading...

Going through the challenges of trying to conceive for a long period of time can put a lot of pressure on any relationship, but new research indicates it can have a strong impact on whether or not a marriage stays together. Women who go through the fertility process without success are more likely to get divorced from their partner after a few years of trying, according to researchers.

The study followed women who went through the process of fertility treatment evaluation for up to 12 years after that initial consultation. The study found that nearly one-third of women reported no longer living with their partner if they had been unsuccessful in conceiving a child.

More than 47,000 women were studied in the research project, following fertility evaluations between 1990 and 2006. Of those women, nearly two-thirds gave birth to at least one child after an initial infertility treatment, while many of the remaining women were not able to conceive a child. Those women who did not find success in fertility treatments were three times as likely to end their relationship or get divorced when compared with women who eventually had at least one child.

Infertility issues can alter the dynamics of a relationship, particularly if one party is having difficulty with their emotions or is feeling guilt. Couples may have different opinions on whether to use other options, like surrogacy or adoption, when fertility treatments fail. Fertility treatments and their resulting success seems to be a very important factor in whether or not some couples are able to stay married. Like other marital issues, infertility can harm communication and may even lead to feelings of resentment. If you are struggling with your marriage as a result of failed infertility and you need advice, contact an Illinois family attorney to walk through your options today.

Continue Reading...

What to do with the House during Divorce

Posted on in Children

During a marriage, each partner contributes to the overall health and wealth of the relationship. One spouse may have supported the other through school.  Or a spouse may have supported the entire family throughout their career.

But, even if one spouse maintains the home and watches the children, they still provide valuable services to the partnership.  Since both spouses deserve a stake in their shared property, then it is important to have a plan about the biggest part of that property, the family home.

Illinois is an equitable distribution state.  That means both spouses have a claim to a portion of the marital home during the division of property but the split may not exactly be 50/50. Each spouse may want to keep the house and even be willing to fight for it.

...

Continue Reading...

Divorce and Domestic Violence in Illinois

Posted on in Children

If you are a victim of domestic violence, filing for divorce can produce higher levels of anxiety for you. Knowing that you will be able to get the assistance you need, however, can be a good way to take the first step and bring you to safety. Hiring a DuPage County lawyer will help to relieve some of your concerns by giving you a sense of what to expect and how to proceed.

In addition to the federal Violence Against Women Act, at the state level there is also the Illinois Domestic Violence Act. Domestic violence is a crime, and in Illinois the standard concerns any person who chokes, hits, kicks, threatens, harasses, or interferes with the personal liberty of a household or family member.

Recently, Governor Pat Quinn has made a concerted effort to tackle domestic violence in the state. Several new laws designed to reduce incidents of domestic violence have recently been at the forefront of the attention of public officials. These laws increase penalties for repeat offenders, require school districts to adopt procedures related to teen dating violence, and support domestic violence victims who might be covered under the abuser's insurance policies.

...

Continue Reading...

In an article written for Psychology Today, Stephen Joseph, Ph.D. states that parents shouldn't underestimate the effects that divorce has on children. Couples will often wait to divorce, thinking that it would be better for the children. But in a study conducted by Dr. Joseph, he found evidence that children of divorce may suffer from post traumatic stress.

Most people who marry don't expect to be divorced. Nevertheless, divorce does happen . When children are involved, waiting to divorce until they are grown may not be the best solution. The logic here is that the events that occur over the years that lead up to divorce are being witnessed and by the children. Therefore, the damage to your children that you may be trying to avoid has already been done having lived in an environment with two parents who don't love each other.

Naturally, as parents you want the best for your children. In some cases that may mean getting a divorce sooner rather than later. The effects of living with two fighting parents could directly affect a child's sense of security. Over a period of time this becomes harder and harder to deal with thus affecting how a child develops emotionally and psychologically. According to Dr. Joseph a child needs to know that he or she has a sense of belonging and safety. Therefore, a child being raised by two fighting parents waiting to get a divorce may be more damaging than that of parents who demonstrate that despite their separation the children are loved.

...

Continue Reading...

Back to Top